Energy+Urbanism

News

Below is a collection of updates, articles and press coverage from projects associated with the Governor’s Chair.

A River Runs Through It

City leaders turned to the river, making an investment to turn brownfields, former industrial sites, green again. The city first built the River Walk, then slowly lengthened that riverfront path, which now stretches for 13 miles. By the time the most recent 3-mile addition opened, $255 million in planned private residential and commercial investment had occurred along that section.


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Project
Tennessee River Studio

Award: Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Prototype

We were honored to hear that AMIE received one of the 2017 R+D AWARDS by Architect Magazine.

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Publication
Architect
Project
AMIE

New Article: Reasons to be Hopeful on Earth Day

In light of the recent changes in our nation’s politics, Governor’s Chair Philip Enquist, FAIA has responded with an article on the importance on remaining focused on sustainability and the issues of our planetary health.

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Feature on Tennessee River Project

Professor Brad Collett recently wrote an article that was published by The River Management Society’s Spring Journal.

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New Lecture: MicNite Spring 2017

James Rose, Director, Institute for Smart Structures, Senior Lecturer and Adjunct Assistant Pro College of Architecture and Design, recently gave a presentation at MicNite Spring 2017 on AMIE 1.0.

Check out the presentation here

Publication
ut-college-of-architecture-design
Project
AMIE

Update: SOM Team in Knoxville for Reviews

SOM team members Phil Enquist and Andrew Obendorf were in Knoxville for reviews of the latest UT additive manufacturing student work and meetings with ORNL.

Project
3D Printed Wall

Update: Tennessee River Project Workshop

This meeting was a follow-up to the Fall 2016 River Studio and brought together representatives from the Governor’s Chair team with community stakeholders to discuss the future of the project and identify next steps. The Tennessee River Project is intended to be a unifying and forward-looking research and visioning effort for the full watershed, the people who live within it, and those who visit it.


Project
Tennessee River Studio

Stewardship of Our Resources: College of Architecture + Design Annual Report 2016

As part of the new Governor’s Chair Tennessee River Studio, led by Brad Collett, students in architecture and landscape architecture trekked more than a thousand miles on a tour of the Tennessee River. The five-day tour crossed four states to bring the group face-to-face with people who influence and interact with the river, often called the Amazon of North America.

The studio investigated 21st-century challenges facing the Tennessee River and its 40,000-square-mile watershed, examining how those who live, work, and engage with the river can understand and mitigate challenges and take advantage of its untapped potential. Students used their extensive research to inform design solutions and create a comprehensive atlas of the watershed, to be published in spring 2017.

Publication
ut-college-of-architecture-design
Project
Tennessee River Studio

University of Tennessee Students Tour Tennessee River

“One of the most striking things we ran into was the biodiversity of the Tennessee River,” Collett said. “It has been referred to as ‘the Amazon of North America’ because of the huge number of species of aquatic life that live in the river.”

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Publication
Knoxville News Sentinel
Project
Tennessee River Studio

Students Complete 1,157-Mile Tour of the Tennessee River

“Four states, five days, 1,157 miles, and all the catfish they could eat. A dozen College of Architecture and Design students have completed their tour of the Tennessee River, but their work has just begun.”

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Publication
Tennessee Today
Project
Tennessee River Studio

Fast Company Innovation by Design

“Because they’re made using additive manufacturing, the house and car could be replicated with minimal waste, and could even be recycled by breaking down the materials and using them to print something else.”

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Publication
Fast Company
Project
AMIE

The Future in 3-D

“What’s the secret sauce to doing big things?” asks Roderick Jackson, ORNL building envelope systems research group leader and technical lead for the project, before answering. “It’s bringing together multidisciplinary teams.”

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Publication
Tennessee Alumnus
Project
AMIE

Build, Raze, Repeat: UT’s New Mantra for New Dorms on its Knoxville Campus

“The Governor Chair’s Studio designs demonstrate how using existing technologies, one can make a fine work of architecture and a highly useful building complex out of something that is neither.

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Publication
The Knoxville Mercury
Project
TVA Tower 2015

Continuing Education: 3-D Printing

“…additive manufacturing can still provide the answer to a variety of pressing problems. SOM’s Brian Lee says that buildings like AMIE could serve as emergency shelter, especially as different printing matrices are developed and tested, and their cost comes down. He raises the possibility that, if there were access to a printer, disaster housing could be printed on-site, from locally sourced material.”

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Publication
Architectural Record
Project
AMIE

Tiny 3-D Printed Building Shares Its Energy With an (Also 3-D Printed) SUV

“This hints at SOM and Oak Ridge’s big-picture plan: designing AMIE 2.0, with high-density urban environments in mind. Enquist says that project would look at building an entire community, instead of standalone units.

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Publication
Wired
Project
AMIE

SOM and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Build World’s Largest 3-D–Printed Structure

“The 38-by-12-by-13-foot structure’s additively manufactured, or 3-D–printed, shell of C-shape forms was assembled at Clayton Homes, which is the nation’s largest manufactured home builder.”

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Publication
Architectural Digest
Project
AMIE

Additive Manufacturing and Integrated Energy (AMIE): College of Architecture + Design Annual Report 2015

The college earned international attention for its involvement in Additive Manufacturing and Integrated Energy (AMIE). AMIE is a system that produces and shares energy between a demonstration building and vehicle, both produced through 3-D printing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Students led by James Rose collaborated with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill on the design of the innovative structure. A presentation on this progressive work was accepted for the national AIA Convention in May 2016.


Publication
ut-college-of-architecture-design
Project
AMIE

A Clean Slate

“For the first time in more than a century, architects are witnessing the birth of an entirely new building system—something that hasn’t happened since the mass production of steel and glass. The additive manufacturing (3-D printing) revolution has already changed the way items like prosthetics and musical instruments are produced. Now it is providing architects with a whole new suite of construction materials.

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Publication
Quest
Project
AMIE

Rapidly renewable, SOM + ORNL design 3D-printed enclosures

“With AMIE, the single-room building module demonstrates the use of additive manufacturing and integrated energy. Its design evolved over time as a team of researchers from ORNL and architects and engineers from SOM collaborated to push conventional limits and bring AMIE1.0 from concept to launch in just one year—a remarkably rapid accomplishment.

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Publication
Builtworlds
Project
AMIE

SOM and Oak Ridge National Lab Debut 3D-Printed Shelter and Car

“A high ratio of insulated to glazed surfaces—79 percent and 21 percent, respectively—helps the enclosure conserve energy. Vacuum-sealed atmospherically insulated panels line the inside of the C-shaped modules while an integrated, flexible rooftop photovoltaic system supplements power supplied to the shelter by the vehicle; the PVs will also charge the vehicle’s battery when it’s not in use. “

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Publication
Architect
Project
AMIE

ORNL Demos Their New Integrated 3D Printed Home and Vehicle

“The advances showcased by AMIE, if incorporated into the United States’ modern power grid, could potentially solve the current housing shortage, our over reliance on fossil fuels and the disastrous environmental impact that both problems cause. But the technology developed could also for the first time bring clean, reliable and stable energy production to nations that do not have the same infrastructure as the United States. Realistically, AMIE could transform developing nations into fully developed nations virtually overnight.

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Publication
3dPrint.com
Project
AMIE

AMIE 3D-Printed Structure Developed through Unique Collaboration, Student Input

“Participating in the development of the AMIE prototype and previous projects affords UT students an unparalleled opportunity to work with the foremost professionals in design and engineering on projects of international significance. Exposing students to the collaborative environment and technological innovations of projects like these prepares them well for shaping the future of the built environment.

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Publication
ut-college-of-architecture-design
Project
AMIE